Posts Tagged '7.04'

Installing Xubuntu

When I installed Xubuntu 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbon“, I could not resist the urge to create a walkthrough for installing Xubuntu. It took me a while to write it up, but here it is. (Note: I have also written a review of Xubuntu 7.10)

Since Xubuntu uses the same installer as Ubuntu and Edubuntu, Ubiquity, this guide also applies to them, and Kubuntu’s installer is basically the same, so it also gives you an overview of what Kubuntu’s installation looks like. Also, the installer has not changed since the previous version, 7.04 “Feisty Fawn“, so it applies to that version too.

To start the installation, you just click the Install icon on the desktop once it is booted. However, I wanted to configure my internet connection first, because that way I would immediately be able to install language packs and whatnot. Note, though, that you can also complete the installation without internet connection.

In order to configure my wireless connection, I click the NetworkManager icon in the top right-hand side. It then pops up a list of detected wireless networks and has an entry listing my wired card.



Simply clicking the network I want to connect with, it prompts me for the passphrase. I can then click Login to Network and I am connected! It couldn’t be easier 🙂



Now that my network connection is all set, I can start Ubiquity (the installation application, remember?). The first screen allows you to select a language and links to Ubuntu’s release notes.



Clicking Forward brings us in the timezone selection screen, where we are presented with a map of the world.



Clicking the area on the map where you live zooms in the map making it easy to select your location.



Clicking Forward again presents us with a screen to select your keyboard layout. It includes many options, including many Dvorak ones (note to self: get to learn to type using Dvorak). An input field allows you to test the selected layout.



Yet again clicking Forward, a dialog box pops up telling the partitioner is being started.



When it has finished loading, you are presented with three partitioning options:

  1. Guided, resizing your main hard drive using the freed up space to install Xubuntu.
  2. Guided – use entire disk to wipe a whole hard drive and install Xubuntu on it.
  3. Manual



I opted for Manual.



The reason for me to select Manual was because I wanted a separate partition for /home, which allows me to keep all documents and settings for all user accounts were I to reinstall Xubuntu (i.e. when a new version is released). Adding the required root (/) and swap partition I ended up with a total of three partitions.



Then we need to provide Xubuntu with some user information for the first user account.



And finally, just before the actual installation will start, you are presented with an overview of everything you have selected so you can check it.



However, before you commence the installation, be sure to click the Advanced button in the bottom right-hand side. It allows you to set the location of the boot loader if you wish to, and enables you to opt in for the “Package usage survey”. If you check the checkbox, Xubuntu will send anonymous application usage data to a central Ubuntu server, so they can generate statistics about which applications are most popular. Not only does this enable the developers to improve the distribution in general, it also influences e.g. the ratings of applications you see in Add/Remove…



It will then start the installation, which will take a while.



Meanwhile, and this is an awesome feature, you can continue to use the system! You can browse the web using Firefox, heck, you can even install new applications for use during that session, all while the installation is progressing!



After a while you will be notified that the installation has finished, and that you should restart the computer to use it.



When you have restarted, with your internet connection configured, you will mostly be notified that updates are available.





I was also notified that I had the option to enable a restricted driver. This driver is not open source, but as I would like to try out Compiz Fusion (more on that in a later post) I wanted to install the driver.



Enabling the driver was very easy – just check the box and it will start the installation.



Once the installation completed, I was notified that I had to restart.



Clicking the notification gave me the option of deferring the restart to a later time, or to restart immediately.



That restart was the last restart I had to do since 🙂

All in all, Xubuntu’s installation process is a breeze. The partitioning part might be a bit scary (but hey, we’ve got Wubi if it’s too scary) but overall, it’s very easy and even comfortable. Being able to use the system while it is installing is a feature that blows away every other operating system I’m aware of, apart from other Linux distributions 🙂

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Extremely useful panel plugin: Clipman

If you do not know what a clipboard or copy/paste is, be sure to check the Wikipedia article.

Xfce has many useful panel plugins. One which I never even knew existed, let alone thought of adding to my panel, was the “Clipboard Manager” aptly named Clipman.

This was until I learnt that it would solve one slight annoyance: something you copy to your clipboard will get lost when you close the window you copied it from. While I was already quite content when I heard that Clipman could fix this, I quickly learnt it has many more benefits which woke up the power user inside me.

One example: did you ever copy something that you wanted to paste elsewhere after you had finished whatever it was that you were doing? If you did then you probably have also experienced that uneasy feeling of having to be constantly aware not to copy anything else in order to preserve the item currently on your clipboard. Well, you can say goodbye to that feeling now, because with Clipman, you can switch back and forth between previously copied items with the smallest effort imaginable.

And as if that weren’t enough, you can also have Clipman save your selections. No more efforts to press Ctrl+C (or even worse: right-click and select Copy!), a measly selection is enough! Oh, by the way, did I mention the small but very convenient ability to paste with a single click on your middle mouse button that is present in every Linux distribution by default?

So, here I am, having convinced you of the sheer greatness of the Clipman Xfce Panel plugin, but I still haven’t told you how to add it to your panel. Well, it’s simple really, as it is already installed by default in Xubuntu. You just right click the panel, click Add New Item, select Clipman and press Add. You can then click the Clipman icon and browse through a handy list of clipboard items previously copied, with the current one highlighted in bold. If you want to configure it, right click the Clipman icon and select Properties. Some of the configuration options include whether you want Clipman to remember selections, how many history items it should remember and whether you want to display line numbers. Have fun with this simple but amazingly convenient plugin!

Note: An alternative for Gnome is Glipper, the KDE alternative, with its highly original name, is Klipper, which doesn’t seem to have a website.

Access to the proprietary world

Who doesn’t like the idea of open source, of sharing, and that every one who is able to can change software to his/her likings and share the changes with the rest of the free software world? Unfortunately, it takes a big deal of self-restraint to only use completely liberated software. Who can resist the attraction of shiny animations on websites (Flash), or those of playing music on your iPod (which does not support any of the free formats that are superior in so many ways)?

Unfortunately, due to a lot of legal restrictions, Xubuntu is unable to add support for these restricted formats to a default installation. Luckily, since Xubuntu Feisty (7.04) it is easier than ever to enable, using Applications->System->Add/Remove.... With just a few clicks, you can install the package “Ubuntu Restricted Extras”. So, I open up Add/Remove… and search for “Restricted Extras”…

Searching for "Restricted Extras" - where is it?

Not found?! Oh, wait…

To broaden your search, choose ‘Show all Open Source applications’ or ‘Show all available’ applications.

So, in the top right-hand corner, I select “All available applications” and, what a surprise, there it is!

Searching for "Restricted Extras" - there it is!

Cliking the checkbox in front of “Ubuntu restricted extras” I get the following pop-up:

This should be "Enable additional repositories?"

Hmm… If you are a person (as in: not a company) then it should be legal for you to install these packages. I am a person, so I click “Install”.
However, the purpose of this window isn’t entirely clear. Indeed, the button said “Install”, but it actually meant “Enable”, as in “enable extra repositories” (i.e. locations to download software from). So, if you were thinking the package would now be installed: you’re wrong. In fact, the checkbox in front of “Ubuntu restricted extras” is still unchecked. Check it now, then click OK. You will be asked if you are sure, click “Apply”. The packages will then finally be installed.

There you have it! You can now play your music and watch YouTube (and yes, you can use Gnash for that, but more likely than not situations will occur where you need a version of Flash later than seven). You can use Java (which will be open sourced and thus can be included in future releases of Xubuntu) and websites will now be displayed in the fonts their authors wanted them to be displayed in! Enjoy!

Note: the next version of Xubuntu, Gutsy Gibbon, will introduce Xubuntu Restricted Extras, which will install packages more appropriate for Xubuntu.

Setting languages

I always have to laugh a bit when I see advertisements for computers loaded with Windows that can dual-boot (!) both English and Dutch versions of Windows. One of the greatest advantage of using Xubuntu (or Ubuntu, or whatever) is that it is easy and, no less important, free of charge to use it in different languages. In fact, you can use different languages on a per-account basis!

To set it up, you just have to open Applications->System->Language Support.

Language support

From there, you can browse through a list of supported languages. I personally prefer British English (which I also set as the default language in the drop-down menu at the bottom), but my sister does not speak English and therefore would like to use my system in Dutch. No problem, I just scroll through the list, select “Dutch” and check the checkbox under “Support”. Now I can click “OK”, upon which it will download the selected language and set it up. And if you later install other applications that have been translated to the other language, that other language will be automatically installed with it.

To set Dutch as the default language for my sister, at the login screen, she can just choose “Dutch” as the language, then when she logs in she will be prompted whether she wants to use it as the default language or just for that session. (Note: depending on the version of Xubuntu, or Ubuntu, you use, a “Languages” button might not be available. To access it, you first have to select Options and then Languages.)

Unfortunately, translating every single piece of software is a huge job, mostly done by volunteers, so not everything will be translated. But the most important software has mostly been translated, and using a partially-translated operating system is already way easier than using one in another language.

Xubuntu Feisty – now from USB drive!

IMPORTANT NOTE: Unless for some specific reason you want to run Xubuntu version 7.04 specifically from your USB Drive, this tutorial is deprecated. I’ve written an updated and much easier tutorial on how to run the latest version of Xubuntu from your USB flash drive.

In my previous post I showed you how you can run Ubuntu Feisty Fawn from your USB drive, and have it preserve any changes you make. In this post, I’ll show you how to do it with Xubuntu. And of course, as usual, you can also view the screenshots as a slideshow.

Using Xubuntu has a few advantages. The first one is that it is more appropriate for this blog (hence the name Xubuntu blog 😉 ), and that I like it better. The second one is that it is faster than Ubuntu, which is quite handy seeing that running it from a USB drive (or flashdrive, pendrive, memory stick, or whatever you’d like to call it) does bring about a speed decrease. The third advantage is that it takes up considerably less space on your USB drive. About 70 MB matters quite a lot, especially if you’re using a 1GB drive (which is the minimum).

But I hear you thinking: didn’t Ubuntu 6.06 “Dapper Drake” already introduce the possibility of such a “persistent liveUSB session”? Why do we need a specific tutorial for Feisty?
OK, perhaps you didn’t think that. But you would be correct if you were: it is already possible since Dapper. However, some packages in Feisty introduced this bug which prevented this feature from working. To work around this bug, we will use some packages from the previous version, 6.10 “Edgy Eft”, which do not suffer from this bug and which most likely won’t cause you additional problems.

Before we start, I’d first like to thank everyone who has worked and is still working on fixing this bug (more details on the bug page and the forum thread) and especially Mike (mjpca) for providing this teporary workaround. His writeup of the steps he took allowed me to do the same for Xubuntu, also using this great guide from “bibe’s” site. And last but not least, this guide would not have been possible without the detailed How-to from Debuntu on how to install Ubuntu on a USB pendrive.

First off, be sure to realize that this will wipe all existing data on your USB drive. Furthermore, these instructions are geared towards Xubuntu, but they’ll also work on other Linux distributions if you change the instructions a bit (e.g. perhaps you use another program for partitioning). It might also work on Windows (I know “syslinux” is available for Windows) but then the instructions will probably differ a lot so it’s your own responsibility.
You need a USB drive of at least 1GB but as that only leaves about 240MB for any additional programs you’d want to install or documents you want to save, I recommend you to use a USB drive of 2GB or more.

The process of putting Xubuntu on your USB drive is not that difficult. Basically we need to divide your USB drive in several regions (partitioning), one of which will hold the modified Xubuntu and one which will hold all your documents and settings. However, because this will take a while, I suggest you already start downloading the modified Xubuntu image generously hosted by pepeio (I have also created a XubuntUSB torrent, hosted on LinuxTracker. If you know how to, please use that torrent.).

As your partitions need to stay unmounted, I recommend you to turn of “Volume Management” (you can turn it on again after you have finished this tutorial). To do so, open Thunar, click Edit->Preferences, then switch to the “Advanced” tab and make sure “Enable Volume Management” is unchecked.

Then, fire up Gparted (Applications->System->GNOME Partition Editor) and, from the drop-down menu in the top right corner, select your USB drive. Be sure to select the correct one, because if you select your hard drive we will remove all data on that and I suppose you won’t like that. Note down the drive (e.g. mine was /dev/sda) because you will need it later. Delete all partitions on your USB drive if there are any, then click the checkmark to apply. After that, the screen should look like this, without any partitions:
Setting up XubuntUSB - no partitions on my USB drive

Right click the “unallocated” space and select “New” to create a new partition, the one that will hold the modified Xubuntu. Set it to be 760 MB (Gparted calls it MiB) and set the filesystem to “FAT16”.
Setting up XubuntUSB - setting the first partition

Then create the second partition, which can take up all the remaining space. Set the filesystem of this one to “ext2”.

Setting up XubuntUSB - setting the second partition

Now, click the checkmark or select Edit->Apply to apply your changes.

Then, open a terminal window (Applications->Accessories->Terminal). In the following command, replace the “/dev/sdx” with your drive (ine was “/dev/sda”, so that would become “/dev/sda1”). If you want, you can change “xubuntusb”, which will be the label for this partition. Enter this command and press enter:
sudo mkfs.vfat -F 16 -n xubuntusb /dev/sdx1
Again, in the following command, change “/dev/sdx” with your drive. This time, however, you may not change the label “casper-rw”, as it will be used to determine where to save changes to. Enter this command and press enter:
sudo mkfs.ext2 -b 4096 -L casper-rw /dev/sdx2

Setting up XubuntUSB - creating the filesystem of the second partition

Now, make sure you have unmounted both partitions (in Thunar, right click them and select “unmount”), then unplug your USB drive. You can then plug it back in and you should see that it will appear with the new labels in Thunar. If the modified Xubuntu has finished downloading, extract it and copy all the files to the “Xubuntusb” drive. You might get complaints about symbolic links that could not be created, but that is no problem, just select “Yes to all”:
Setting up XubuntUSB - sfailed to create symbolic links, no problem

Copying of the files should take a while (especially the file “filesystem.squashfs”), but when it’s done, there is just one final step you have to do: make sure your computer can boot from the device. In order to do this, you need “syslinux” and “mtools”, so fire up Synaptic (Applications->System->Synaptic Package Manager), mark those for installation and click apply. When they are installed, first unmount both your partitions, then open a terminal window (Applications->Accessories->Terminal) and execute
sudo syslinux -f /dev/sdx1

Setting up XubuntUSB - now allow it to be booted, and we're done!

If everything went allright, you should now be able to run XubuntUSB, congratulations! If it didn’t work for you, see “Troubleshooting” below, if it did, please leave a notice in the comments. Thanks!

Note: If you want to create a new user, be sure to grant administrator rights, otherwise it may cause errors.

Another note: For those who don’t like the amount of files on their USB drive, Fisslefink posted a great how-to which guides you to using GRUB instead of Syslinux, so that only two folders will be used. It didn’t work for me, but since he also includes instructions on how to revert back to Syslinux, there is no harm in trying.

Troubleshooting

If you experience any troubles, please first check if your problem is in the following list, and if not, please ask for help in the forum thread.

  • If, upon boot, you get the message no partition active, you have to set it active for boot. Open up a Terminal (Applications->Accessories->Terminal) and type sudo fdisk /dev/sdx (you know, replace sdx with your drive). Press “a” and then “1”. Press “w” to save and then it should work!
  • You might think it is weird that your casper-rw drive shows up on your desktop, and actually, it shouldn’t, but everything still worked as it should with me, so it should not be a problem. Note that you cannot browse it, though.
  • Toad mentions that he could not boot from his USB drive with this tutorial for Ubuntu, but he fixed it:

    I finally got the computer to boot from the USB stick. I had to set the fat16 partition to bootable. ‘cfdisk /dev/sdx’ should do the trick, just press enter on the set bootable option.

  • If this worked, but after a while it doesn’t anymore, you can remove any edits you did to restore it to the point where it worked (all your settings will be lost though):
    sudo mkfs.ext2 -b 4096 -L casper-rw /dev/sdx2
    (Thank zenobiaflex for this one)
  • If your drive won’t boot correctly, your Master Boot Record may be corrupted. You can repair it with Lilo (so open up Synaptic from Applications->System->Synaptic Package Manager and install the package lilo) using the following command from the terminal:
    sudo lilo -M /dev/sdx
    (From PiterP)
  • If, during shutdown, the screen switches from the shutdown screen with the Xubuntu logo with the progress bar to a black screen, possibly with error messages, then you computer is probably just shutting down the normal way without notifying you of its status. At a certain moment (not too long after the screen turned black) it will have reached the point where it would have normally said something like “remove the disk, close the tray (if any) and press enter”. So when the screen turns black, you just have to try to press enter a little while after it has turned black.

Ubuntu Feisty on your USB drive – finally!

IMPORTANT NOTE: Unless for some specific reason you want to run Ubuntu version 7.04 specifically from your USB Drive, this tutorial is deprecated. I’ve written an updated and much easier tutorial on how to run the latest version of Ubuntu from your USB flash drive.

Important: As SurJector mentions, he has found another workaround that is much less work. After you have followed his instructions, you can skip on to the partitioning part (i.e. that part that is very similar to almost my whole post about putting Xubuntu on your USB drive).

Update: I now also have a guide on putting Xubuntu Feisty on your USB drive.

Note: All screenshots are also available as a slideshow.

When, in June 2006, Ubuntu Dapper Drake was released, it introduced a very exciting new feature: the ability to run it from a USB drive (also pendrive, USB bar or memory stick). This would work just like a LiveCD, with the big improvement that all your data could be saved onto the USB drive! This means not just your documents, but also e.g. network settings or your desktop background. You were practically carrying around a fully-functional operating system on your USB drive!

However, as Ubuntu 7.04 “Feisty Fawn” contained some new packages, it also introduced a bug due to which your data would no longer be saved. When it was released, this bug still wasn’t fixed. It is expected to be fixed in the next release, 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbon”, to be released in October of this year. Up until then, we’re out of luck.

You’d think. However, thanks to the hard work of Mike (mjpca on the Ubuntu Forums) and some others (see the bug report on Launchpad and the thread on the Ubuntu Forums) there is now a way to work around this bug, which I’m going to show you in this post.

The basic idea is that the files that prevent persistence (the ability to save your data to the USB drive) from working can be replaced by their previous versions as present in Ubuntu 6.10 “Edgy Eft”. However, because files on the LiveCD are compressed so they can fit on one CD, replacing these files requires quite some effors. Luckily, Mike has done all the hard work for you and has created a new hybrid Edgy/Feisty image. To use it, your computer needs to be of the type Intel x86. Don’t worry, if you don’t know what this is, you probably use it. Furthermore, I recommend you use a USB drive of at least 2 GB, because the image is quite large.
For those with 1GB USB drives or who prefer Xubuntu (which would be me ;)) I plan on creating a Xubuntu image, but I’m not quite sure if I’m able to. If it works out, of course I’ll post on this blog.

Note: This tutorial is adapted from this How-to from Debuntu.org.

To start, fire up Gparted from Applications->System->GNOME Partition Editor (note: for those that do not use Xubuntu, you’ll have to find the applications yourself). On the top, right-hand side, you can select which drive you want to partition — select your USB drive. Be careful not to select any other drive, because you will be erasing all data that is available on that drive! You first have to delete all existing partitions, which will erase all existing data. Note down or remember the name of your drive, because you’ll need it later. Mine is /dev/sda

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - clear partitions

We then create the first partition, which will contain Ubuntu. Set its size to 840 MB (which is the same as MiB), its filesystem to FAT16 and leave the rest as is.

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - creating main partition

We will then create the second partition, which will hold all of our data. Just let it take all of the remaining space and set the filesystem to ext2.

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - creating casper-rw partition

Make sure that every partition is unmounted. If a partition is not, right-click it and select unmount.

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - make sure they are unmounted

You then see an overview of how the drive will be partitioned — click the checkmark or select Edit->Apply to apply your actions.

Preparing my USB drive for persistence

It will ask you if you are sure, because it will erase all your data. If you’re fine with that, select Apply.

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - continue?

You’ll then have to wait a little while Gparted applies the operations. When it’s finished, you can close Gparted.

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - creating partitions...

Now you need to format each partition and give it a label. The name of the first partition, which holds Ubuntu, does not matter that much, however, the partition that needs to hold your data needs to be named casper-rw.

To partition and label the first partition, run the following command, in which you replace /dev/sdx with the name of your drive (Remember? Mine was /dev/sda). Note that I named it UbuntUSB (how original) but if you want, you can just use another name:
$ sudo mkfs.vfat -F 16 -n UbuntUSB /dev/sdx1
This won’t take long. For the second partition, you run this command, again, replacing /dev/sdx with the name of your drive (but keep the name casper-rw!):
$ sudo mkfs.ext2 -b 4096 -L casper-rw /dev/sdx2
This will take a bit longer, and will also output more.

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - setting labels

And here comes the fun part. You need to download the image that Mike created (generously hosted by pepeio. Use the second ISO he created). After it has finished downloading (can take quite a while) you need to extract the .iso file using Xarchiver. I recommend you to save it to a folder in /tmp so that it will be deleted on shutdown, because you don’t need it after you’re finished. I saved it to /tmp/ubuntu-livecd. Make sure you check “Extract files with full path”.

Extracting the .iso

Now you need to copy some files (which contain Ubuntu) to your USB drive, onto the first partition (which I named UbuntUSB). First copy the folders casper, disctree, dists, install, pics, pool, preseed and .disk (to see this one, select View->Show Hidden Files). Then we need the files md5sum.txt, README.diskdefines and ubuntu.ico. Then move to the folder “isolinux” in the extracted folder (so for me, that would be /tmp/ubuntu-livecd/isolinux), but do not change your location in the USB drive. Copy all the files that are present in the isolinux folder to your USB drive. Then, move into the “casper” folder in the extracted folder (/tmp/ubuntu-livecd/casper) and copy vmlinuz and initrd.gz to your USB drive. Finally, move into the “install” folder in the extracted folder (/tmp/ubuntu-liveusb/install) and copy mt86plus to your USB drive.

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - copying required files

Now, on your USB drive, rename the file isolinux.cfg to
syslinux.cfg.

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - rename isolinux.cfg to syslinux.cfg

Replace all its contents with the following:

DEFAULT persistent
GFXBOOT bootlogo
GFXBOOT-BACKGROUND 0xB6875A
APPEND file=preseed/ubuntu.seed boot=casper initrd=initrd.gz ramdisk_size=1048576 root=/dev/ram rw quiet splash --
LABEL persistent
menu label ^Start Ubuntu in persistent mode
kernel vmlinuz
append file=preseed/ubuntu.seed boot=casper persistent initrd=initrd.gz ramdisk_size=1048576 root=/dev/ram rw quiet splash --
LABEL live
menu label ^Start or install Ubuntu
kernel vmlinuz
append file=preseed/ubuntu.seed boot=casper initrd=initrd.gz ramdisk_size=1048576 root=/dev/ram rw quiet splash --
LABEL xforcevesa
menu label Start Ubuntu in safe ^graphics mode
kernel vmlinuz
append file=preseed/ubuntu.seed boot=casper xforcevesa initrd=initrd.gz ramdisk_size=1048576 root=/dev/ram rw quiet splash --
LABEL check
menu label ^Check CD for defects
kernel vmlinuz
append boot=casper integrity-check initrd=initrd.gz ramdisk_size=1048576 root=/dev/ram rw quiet splash --
LABEL memtest
menu label ^Memory test
kernel mt86plus
append -
LABEL hd
menu label ^Boot from first hard disk
localboot 0x80
append -
DISPLAY isolinux.txt
TIMEOUT 50
PROMPT 1
F1 f1.txt
F2 f2.txt
F3 f3.txt
F4 f4.txt
F5 f5.txt
F6 f6.txt
F7 f7.txt
F8 f8.txt
F9 f9.txt
F0 f10.txt

Save that and close. For our last step, we need the packages syslinux and mtools, so fire up Synaptic (Applications->System->Synaptic Package Manager) and install them. Make sure that your USB drive is unmounted, then go into a terminal (Applications->Accessories->Terminal) and enter the following command, replacing /dev/sdx with the name of your drive:
$ sudo syslinux -f /dev/sdx1

Preparing my USB drive for persistence - making my USB drive bootable

Well, all that is left now is to test it, so boot from your USB drive, and then you’ll (if everything went right) be greeted with a screen like the one I was greeted with:

My Ubuntu Feisty Desktop from my USB drive

If this tutorial worked for you, please leave a reply in the comments here. If it didn’t work, you can also leave a comment, or rather (if you have an account) post a message in the Ubuntu forums thread, so we can find a way to fix it.

Note: If you want to create a new user, be sure to grant administrator rights, otherwise it may cause errors.

Troubleshooting

  • Toad mentions that he could not boot from his USB drive, but he fixed it:

    I finally got the computer to boot from the USB stick. I had to set the fat16 partition to bootable. ‘cfdisk /dev/sdx’ should do the trick, just press enter on the set bootable option.

  • If this worked, but after a while it doesn’t anymore, you can remove any edits you did to restore it to the point where it worked (all your settings will be lost though):
    $ sudo mkfs.ext2 -b 4096 -L casper-rw /dev/sdx2
    (Thank zenobiaflex for this one)
  • If you want more than the two partitions described here on your disk, be sure that the first partition needs to be the FAT16 partition, as that’s where the bootloader gets loaded which needs to be on the first partition. Thanks Matt.
  • If your drive won’t boot correctly, your Master Boot Record may be corrupted. You can repair it with Lilo (so open up Synaptic from Applications->System->Synaptic Package Manager and install the package lilo) using the following command from the terminal:
    $ sudo lilo -M /dev/sdx
    (From PiterP)
  • If, during shutdown, the screen switches from the shutdown screen with the Xubuntu logo with the progress bar to a black screen, possibly with error messages, then you computer is probably just shutting down the normal way without notifying you of its status. At a certain moment (not too long after the screen turned black) it will have reached the point where it would have normally said something like “remove the disk, close the tray (if any) and press enter”. So when the screen turns black, you just have to try to press enter a little while after it has turned black.

Controlling your media player

In my previous post, I promised I’d show how to control your media player to skip to the next song when you press a combination of keys. Admittedly, I should’ve posted this earlier (especially since it’s not that big a post), but better late than never, isn’t it?

The basic idea is that you can run a command with so-called arguments. Most (if not all) media players on Linux also take arguments to skip to the previous or next song in your playlist, or to play/pause the current track. This is extremely useful if you just want to listen to music without the program you use to play it bothering you.

You know how to find the command of your media player (I explained it in Your wish is Xubuntu’s command). My media player is Exaile, the command of which is “exaile”. This is what I’ll be using in this post, but you can replace it by the command of your preferred media player.

To find out which arguments a program takes, you have to resort to a terminal window (Applications->Accessories->Terminal). From there, you can read a program’s manual by typing man <command>, so I’d use man exaile:
Exaile's man page
You can read through it by using the arrow keys and exit the manual by pressing “q” (so “Esc” won’t work!).

Some programs don’t have a manual, but if they don’t, they mostly take the --help argument, which gives you an overview of all other arguments available. I’d use exaile --help:
exaile --help

As you see, Exaile supports both of these commands. It doesn’t really matter which I use, both tell me I can skip to the next song with the --next argument (or -n), to the previous one with --prev (or -p), and play/pause (depending on its current state) with --play-pause (or -t, from toggle).

Knowing that, I opened up the Keyboard Settings (Applications->Settings->Keyboard Settings) and in the Shortcuts-tab I set the commands exaile --prev, exaile --play-pause and exaile --next to some keyboard shortcuts. I could then control Exaile using my keyboard! Now, every time I start Exaile I minimize it to the system tray so that it would just be an icon in my panel. Using the “LibNotify Plugin” I get a notification which song I skip to, making my media player as unobtrusive as possible:

Xubuntu Feisty just installed - Cool, integration!

Customisations like this are the reason I love using Xubuntu – it adapts to you instead of the other way around. It are these little things that makes using a computer just that extra bit more pleasant.


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